How to Leave The Mormon Church: Apostasy, Disgrace or Suicide

2 Jul

It was quite a rare spectacle. On Saturday, June 30th in Salt Lake City, Utah 150 Mormons quit their church in a mass resignation ceremony. It seems to be happening more and people are becoming quite interested in the waves of resignation from the Mormon Church on the basis of increasing awareness of its fraud and manipulation.

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A Mass Exodus from Mormonism, June 30, 2012

This is far from the norm in a religion where the the removal of a person’s name from Church membership cancels the effects of baptism and confirmation, withdraws the priesthood held by a male member, and revokes temple blessings. One can only return once to the faith. A second time, it’s for good. It is something not to be taken lightly. Certainly it’s not the spiritual equivalent of giving up soda. A former Bishop has even told me,” this stuff runs deep, deeper that most non-members realize.” The indoctrination for many unfortunates starts young and requires a devoted mind which must divest itself partially of reason and start to accept a bunch of incredulous tall tales as absolute truths. Not too easy.

The Mormons have a history of intolerance towards outsiders or even those unwilling to be indoctrinated into this “cult” as it’s referred to by universally all ex-Mormons. Some of the behavior reared its ugly head early on in Mormon history. An atrocity occurred when a caravan of pioneers, fleeing famine and pursuing a life out west, had the misfortune of passing through the Utah Territories in 1857.

It was actually September 11th that year when the Mountain Meadows Massacre took place. Sources estimate that between 120 and 140 men, women and children were killed at Mountain Meadows, a rest stop on the Old Spanish Trail, in the Utah Territory. A small group of children, thought to be too young to inform on the perpetrators, was spared and taken in by Mormon families in Southern Utah. The Utah Territorial Militia was responsible for the atrocities. Scholars still debate whether senior Mormon leadership, including Brigham Young, directly instigated the massacre or if responsibility lies with the local leaders of southern Utah. Suspicion or dissent is not tolerated in the church. Generally, Mormons do not look propitiously upon anyone who does not unconditionally accept the doctrine of a philandering charlatan named Joseph Smith.

Two states are considered predominately Mormon, Utah and Idaho. I’ve driven through both states and perhaps erroneously, I felt like an outsider. It was definitely not the same feeling as other states I’ve driven through, even small town, weird Nevada feels more welcoming. In Utah and Idaho, many of fhe kids are raised in fear of the church, it rules every facet of their lives. They are forced to wake up at ungodly hours to attend seminary before they begin high school every day.

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High School/College and Mormon Seminary go hand in hand in Pocatello, Idaho. One even gets its own traffic light.

The religion doesn’t tolerate deviance. You can just imagine the angst a teenager who may be gay must feel being something the church simply forbids. Suicide is coincidentally high in both states. The Idaho Council on Suicide Prevention notes that Idaho has the 4th highest suicide rate in the U.S. In Utah, a state where around 70% of the population is LDS, the suicide rate for youth (especially in “Mormon suburbs” as some call them) is unbelievably high, approximately twice the national average. This is for both teenage boys and girls in Utah .

Women are of course discriminated against in this male-dominated cult. Therefore, they are taking approximately 65% more anti-depressant medication per capita, compared to other American women. Utah also leads the nation in bankruptcies and consumption of internet pornography per capita. None of this is never addressed publicly by church leaders, or even acknowledged.

The Mormons control many aspects of life in small towns in both states. If you are even thinking of leaving the church, hundreds have tales of ostracism and shunning for you which you may want to hear first. An ex-Mormon friend confided this in me: “When some of my member friends found out that I was leaving the church, you would think I had contracted leprosy. People who before would have told you that they were my best friends suddenly disappeared. One asked me what sin it was that I wanted to commit so badly that I felt I needed to leave the church!”

One of the more famous “apostates” is even a relation of Willard Romney, Mormon royalty. Park Romney, Willard’s second cousin, who has written a riveting account of his journey away from the faith. The Apostasy of a High Priest is certainly not part of the Romney campaign’s required reading list, but it’s full of fantastic reasons why this religion is completely insane. It is very hard to understand how very intelligent people can

Park Romney, Ex-Mormon & Mitt Romney, Mormon Royalty

compartmentalize science and reason in one part of their brain and throw logic to the wind in another lobe. With the Mormon faith, you are apparently so brainwashed, you can be a brilliant scientist on the one hand and then honestly believe it’s ok for a people to have permitted local leaders to push, trick, even threaten men into surrendering their wife or girlfriend to polygamy as another real belief. I find it amazing how many of these people are very educated and still hold fast to these beliefs. It’s really astonishing what the human mind can convince itself is factual.

But those who leave, as both my sources have, feel amazed they actually fell for that nonsense and chicanery. It’s almost as if they have been declared dead in their Mormon world. Mormon leaders claim this is not true, but it happens EVERY time someone chooses to step out. Ostracized doesn’t even begin to describe the alienation. This is why those brave souls who professed their independence from the religion must be welcomed by their non-Mormon friends.

I wish there was more we can do for the unhappy, especially the forlorn Lost Boys of Polygamy, among other LDS skeptics. There actually IS hope and life after leaving the Mormon Church. There are many great people who have done so for many valid reasons. I haven’t even begun to scratch the surface on the myriad of other fallacies the LDS faith contains, which is quite incredulous, but I don’t plan to even discuss all the dogmatic errors inherent in the doctrine. I simply am amazed at the statistics regarding the people of the faith. The facts don’t lie. There is trouble in Mormon Paradise.

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15 Responses to “How to Leave The Mormon Church: Apostasy, Disgrace or Suicide”

  1. laserhaas July 2, 2012 at 11:17 am #

    You look, read and study the issues of our lives; then you see this stuff & go Wow!

  2. Sarvo July 2, 2012 at 8:20 pm #

    The level of cognitive dissonance is bound to increase as Mainstream Media popularizes sinful activities more and more. A faithless society engenders faithlessness.

  3. James Didericksen July 2, 2012 at 10:54 pm #

    As a Mormon sceptic I would suggest that you would gain my more credibility in your stated opinions if you dropped the vitriolic and sarcastic rhetoric. I can reiterate all you say about being shunned and ostracized after 50 years of activity my neighbors are now, what I view, as being afraid me. However, you know and I know the Church does not force anyone to attend seminary. So, your claim otherwise calls into question your veracity, that’s not good

    • vegasjessie July 3, 2012 at 10:50 am #

      As an opinion blog, vitriolic rhetoric is pretty justified when we’re discussing a culture that leads to suicide. No kids raised Mormon are allowed to openly dissent and NOT attend seminary.

      • laserhaas July 7, 2012 at 4:46 pm #

        That’s okay vegasjessie – we know your heart’s in the right place. Ignore the naysay’s.

  4. readerjoe January 7, 2013 at 4:40 pm #

    I would like to offer you the opportunity to read my controversial new novel, A Mormon Massacre, available on Amazon. Here is a little information about the book:

    This modern-day novel is informed by the actual massacre of 150 innocent Americans allegedly by Mormon zealots in the Utah Territory in September of 1857. This reigned as the largest mass slaughter of Americans by Americans until the Oklahoma City bombing, excluding the Civil War. In present-day Nashville, Tennessee, Jeremiah Cameron grows up with a prejudice against the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for the murders in 1857. Many Camerons died at the hands of Mormon assassins at Mountain Meadows.

    Jeremiah’s hatred multiplies when his father, Luke, informs him that his mother suffered abuse at the hands of her Mormon husband after being forced into marriage at twelve years old. Due to his father’s association with the Mormon Victim’s Action Committee, Jeremiah gets an opportunity to go undercover in hopes of exposing Mormons as abusers. With his father’s encouragement and the knowledge of his mother’s horrific experience, Jeremiah accepts M-VAC’s offer to train and insert him into an LDS community.

    Jeremiah’s objective broadens when he sees more than he expected. Now he wants to expose the entire Church as a violent and dangerous fraud.

    If you are interested, please email me at rinald47@hotmail.com and let me know which format you would prefer. Electronic formats only, please. Thank you.

    Joe Rinaldo

    • nich October 16, 2013 at 1:05 am #

      none of that is true I don’t know what you are trying to gain by writing hateful fiction about people go to this link if you have questions about mormon views on suicide http://www.lds.org/topics/suicide?lang=eng

  5. 18650行動電源 June 22, 2013 at 7:55 am #

    I’ve been searching on-line greater than 3 hours these days, yet I by no means found any interesting article like yours. It is fairly worth sufficient for me. Personally, if all site owners and bloggers made great content as you did, the net will probably be much more useful than ever prior to.

  6. nich October 16, 2013 at 1:03 am #

    i am mormon and this article is completely fictional if you want to know about mormon views on suicide or anything else just use our website here is an address about lds views on suicide http://www.lds.org/topics/suicide?lang=eng

    • Mark Larsen (@yanquetino) October 16, 2013 at 7:37 am #

      Sorry, “nich,” but what this article states is *not* fictional, but hits the nail on the head.

      I would suggest that you really do need to dig deeper into the history, doctrines, and practices of your cult. I’ve been there, done that, and have to tell you with brutal honesty that it was founded on an unconscionable fraud from the very beginning. Members might not want to “see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil,” but when all is said and done… the Emperor is Naked.

  7. Dale Orr October 22, 2013 at 5:21 pm #

    Whewwww… I’m not sure where to start. I was raised LDS, attended seminary and served a mission for the church. I had experienced a number of severe traumas growing up extreme bullying, sexual abuse, questioned sexuality, etc. and had a horrible struggle to say the least. Before anyone jumps to any notions let me state that none of the aforementioned abuse was at the hands of family or church leaders.

    Due to decisions and actions that I made contrary to my own personal beliefs I was excommunicated from the church. The process was not vindictive or harsh but it was heart-rending as I was no longer a part of something I believed and loved. I hold no animus against those men or the church. I was not ostracized, shunned or rejected by either my family or the local congregation. They continued to reach out to me and let me know that I was loved. In fact, I continued to attend the church even though I could no longer participate.

    Several years later I was accepted for re-baptism and was a member once again. My priesthood and temple blessings were not restored at that time as I needed to continue on my course of self improvement and walk of faith. However, my struggles were not over and due to more personal choices I was sadly excommunicated a SECOND time. While I felt the awful loss once again I had the support of all those around me. A loving Bishop helped and encouraged me to take a much needed step.

    I had never sought professional help for my childhood traumas and so I made the decision to do so at this time. After intensive, long-term counseling sessions (non-church affiliated) I felt that many of these past issues had been addressed to some degree and I could manage with follow-up therapy.

    It was 15 years later that I was finally re-baptized once again and later my priesthood and blessings were restored and I was sealed to my wife and children in the temple.

    I have no axe to grind nor am I throwing stones at this website or its author. I am simply sharing my story and pointing out that some of the information presented in it as fact, are inaccurate. A person can be “cast out” more than once and still return. W.W. Phelps an early leader of the church and the author of one of the most famous of Mormon Hymns, “The Spirit of God Like a Fire Is Burning”, had a similar path and was likewise excommunicated twice. I am happily married to a wonderful wife and have 6 amazing children. We are very close and God and the church are an important part of all of our lives. Thank you for reading.

  8. revitconvert January 3, 2014 at 9:06 pm #

    If ANY religion digs deep enough, they will also find things they are not proud of and have (hopefully) retracted or apologized about. “Let him who is without sin cast the first stone….”

  9. vegasjessie January 3, 2014 at 10:55 pm #

    Or you could watch this. http://youtu.be/LdCEJISKWHc

  10. wibratory May 17, 2014 at 5:39 pm #

    Good post. I learn something new and challenging on websites I stumbleupon every
    day. It’s always useful to read content from other authors and use a little something from
    other websites.

  11. John Frum May 21, 2014 at 4:29 am #

    That’s not exactly an excuse, but more of an indictment against all religions which claim divine authority from their founding and presuppose belief in God-designated human leadership, such as the pope or prophet. In Mormonism, it is taught that God would remove a prophet before He would allow that man to lead the Church astray. This is in direct contradiction to the retractions of doctrine which have occurred at the highest level of the Church, even after requiring strict adherence to the false doctrine beforehand – as in the case of polygamy, the Kirtland Safety Society, the lineage of native Americans as Lamanites, the mark of Cain, age of the earth & creationism, the nature of God, changing temple ceremonies, etc.

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